February 2018

Exhibitions

19.12.2017–4.3.2018

Andrei Lajunen: On Certainty

The photographic artist Andrei Lajunen (1969–1999) considered the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein's works On Certainty and Remarks on Colour to be some of the most important influences behind his artistic thinking and practice. The set of works, on view at our museum's collection corner Kuvakulma, was created during Lajunen's first years of study at the University of Art and Design Helsinki.

Exhibitions

12.1.–18.3.
Karl Henrik Edlund, from the series Bright Hours

Karl Henrik Edlund: Bright Hours

Bright Hours refers to something past – an uncertain place that does not exist, something fragile and indefinite. The project is based on Karl Henrik Edlund's journeys to the Arctic North and northwest Russia in 2008–2013. The series also contains photographs from Edlund's everyday life in Saint Petersburg and the Åland islands.

Exhibitions

27.1.–11.3.
Photo: Leevi Toija

Photofuss: I am on vacation.

Photofuss, the youth group of The Finnish Museum of Photography, presents photographic material from a holiday spent in everyday life.

Exhibitions

7.2.–20.5.

Opening on Tue, Feb 6, 6–8 pm: Does it feel familiar? – Photographs of everyday life in Finland

What does your everyday life feel like: the morning rush-hour or a sleep-in in the morning, lunch at the canteen or a quickly grabbed ready meal from the shop? In 2016, ten photographers documented everyday Finnish life, each from their own personal point of view. The starting point was to comment on the increasing inequality in Finnish society. People may find some of the stories captured in the images easy to relate to, while others may be more remote.

Exhibitions

7.2.–20.5.
Photo: Heidi Piiroinen

Heidi Piiroinen: The Invisibles – Story of a Beggar Family

For 10 years, photographer Heidi Piiroinen and journalist, author Kimmo Oksanen have been following the life of Romanian Mihaela Stoica and her family and siblings in Finland, Romania, Greece, Estonia and France. Through the personal story of Mihaela, the exhibition deals with larger societal issues and the phenomenon of Romanian people leaving their homes and becoming street beggars in Western Europe.